Cunningham, Scott (Netherlands, Delft)

PhD, Associate Professor at the Department of Policy Analysis, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Netherlands.

PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS:
Probabilistic models for policy analysis, rational models for policy analysis, decision support systems, network analysis, and infrastructure.

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL CAREER:

Degrees:

PhD in Technology and Innovation Policy, University of Sussex
MSc in Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology
BEng in Engineering Science and Mechanics, Georgia Institute of Technology
Scott Cunningham joined the faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in 2004. Prior to this, he worked in the computer and software industry, creating analytical models for commercial clients. His work on national innovation indicators helps inform policy for the governments of the U.S., the U.K. and Malaysia. Scott Cunningham is interested in operations research and decision sciences approaches for policy making. In particular, he is interested in probabilistic models of social exchange. Other interests include building multi-actor systems theory through the economic sociology and innovation policy literatures. A recent publication is Tech Mining (with Alan Porter), a book on assessing new technology developments.

KEY SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS:

  • Cunningham, S. W. and J. H. Kwakkel (2016). Tech mining for Engineering Managers. New York: Momentum Press.
  • Cunningham, S. W. and C. Werker (2012). Proximity and collaboration in European nanotechnology. Papers in Regional Science, 91(4): 723-724.
  • Roper, A. T., Cunningham, S. W., Porter, A. L., Mason, T. W., Rossini, F. A. and J. Banks (2010). Forecasting and Management of Technology, Second Edition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  •  Porter, A. L. and S. W. Cunningham (2004). Tech Mining. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Technology Futures Analysis Methods Working Group (2004). Technology futures analysis: Toward integration of the field and new methods, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 71 (3): 287-303.

Recent publications:
2018

2017

2016

2015

CONFERENCES AND COMPETITIONS PARTICIPATION/AWARDS:

  • Best Paper Award at the15th IFIP I3E conference on e-Business, e-Services and e-Society (2016)
  • EURO Journal on Decision Processes (online Journal – Editor, 2014)
  • Linking systems and actors to understand policy games in the management of delta infrastructures (2012, Speaker)
  • The shifting sands of coastal flood management in South Africa (2012, Speaker)
  • International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (online Journal - Editor, 2011)

The topic of his report: "Places as a Nexus, a discussion about how places attract inventors".

Abstract
Why are specific places so often the nexus for new inventions?  For instance San Jose, California well outpaces other U.S. cities in absolute and even relative numbers of patents. This presentation uses ideas from the geography of technology to better understand technology emergence. Features of the physical, social and institutional environment provide strong clues.  Nonetheless strongly innovative regions rarely persist over time. And other technologies, including general purpose technologies, lack any strongly regional focus at all. These elements of geography and emergence present both a challenge and opportunity for measuring emergent technologies using science and technology indicators.

PhD, Associate Professor at the Department of Policy Analysis, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Netherlands.
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